Turkey Turkey Turkey Day!


Happy Turkey Day to my American friends in blogland!  I don’t get why you guys put it so late in the fall, but you make up for it by merging yams and marshmallows and brown sugar into an unholy trinity of glorious “no really, it’s not dessert!”

In honor of your ever-so-belated day of giving thanks (seriously, it’s way too close to christmas), I plan to try this completely not-a-dessert recipe for Stuffed Sweet Potatoes from Sweet Pea’s Kitchen.

What am I thankful for on this entirely ordinary Thursday in Canada?

I’m thankful that the salmon are done running, and that the animals have had time to eat all the dead salmon.  Because old-rotted-raw-salmon-on-the-river-bank, as I have learned the hard way, is a demon-smell worse than skunk, but less terrible than old-dead-naked-beaver.

right before he found the beaver. photo courtesy of fellow Meetup member from the hike.  From then on, he looked like a greased up brown dog, and for the next two weeks, any area he sat on for any length of time started smelling like a weazel nest full of piss.  SUPER grateful that this phase of our fall is over.

Gwynn is thankful that the two week period in which he got 5 baths, including one that involved vinegar, coke and baby shampoo, rinced and then applied again is over.

I’m also thankful that, this week, when I took Gwynn and Sadie into the woods for a walk, it was Sadie that rolled in something I’m going to loosely label ‘mud’.  There are times it’s really nice to be able to pass a dog back to its rightful dog-bather at the end of a walk.

A gorgeous fall day, on the Canadian Thanksgiving weekend. Plus side to an early thanksgiving? less chance of snow!

Hope you have a safe and happy Thanksgiving (or Thursday), preferably full of so much food that you pop a button on your pants.  Because, regardless of which Thanksgiving day you do, it’s all about the turkey!

Advertisements
Previous Post
Next Post

9 Comments

  1. Great photos!
    Happy Thanksgiving!!

  2. Happy non-Thanksgiving 🙂 I have only had the pleasure (not being sarcastic) of seeing a Salmon die off in a creek once. I was actually surprised at how little it smelled. Of course I was over 100 feet away and my dog was not rolling in said salmon (opening up their stinky goodness I presume).

    • I haven’t seen the actual die-off… they’re much more stinky a few weeks after they’ve all died off already, unfortunately. Which is where my dog and his craving for that certain ‘je ne sais quoi’ smell comes in.

  3. I hope you had a great perfectly normal Thursday! I’m a little afraid of that recipe you posted, I’m not going to lie. But I would definitely try it!

    Today I am grateful for a dog who never seems interested in rolling in anything. And I am grateful we don’t live any where near a salmon creek. 😛

    • It turned out tasty, though I think next time I do a candied yam type recipe, I’ll just do it in a pan – less hassle, and yam-skins are not nearly as hardy as potato skins, and not ideal for stuffing. Still extremely tasty, though, and I liked that it meant that I could make exactly the number for the number of people having it – we did a half-skin for each person, leaving one half-skin (minus the candied-ness) for Gwynn

  4. Thanks had a wonderful day. I believe our date is based on our history of the first Thanksgiving way back in the 1600’s which was purported to be in November (not sure that they called it Thanksgiving but it was to celebrate the harvest).

    Love the pictures of the dogs playing in the river. I believe those dead salmon can be toxic if dogs eat them too. Best to stay away.

    • The harvest festival definitely makes sense – it would explain all the eating that both our Thanksgivings have in common 🙂
      Thankfully, Gwynn wasn’t in an eating-them mood – just using them as perfume. I think anything that’s been rotting that long is toxic for dogs.

  5. Lovely post, Lexy – uplifting for us in the UK as well as over there! And, as always, just lovely pictures.

    • Do you have a similar sort of harvest celebration in the fall, or is it a very North American thing?

%d bloggers like this: